A competency framework to demonstrate continuing competence

In November 2016 the CPD hour ceased. The SRA have now moved to a continuing competence based approach to personal development. Solicitors are required by the SRA to make a declaration of competence to practise each year by demonstrating continuing competence, rather than completing 16 hours cpd.

But what do the SRA mean by competent?

SRA Continuing Competence

The SRA define competence as:

the ability to perform the roles and tasks required by one’s job to the expected standard (Eraut & du Boulay 2001).

In layman’s terms – the skills knowledge & behaviours to do your job well.

How do you measure continuing competence?

Using a competency framework, which defines observable behaviours, can be enormously helpful.  At Athena Professional we have  developed a continuing competence framework for the legal sector.  Our competency framework maps back to the SRA competencies, thus ensuring you are in a position to make your declaration of competence to practise.

If you would like to download our continuing competence framework please click here.

Competency Framework for the Legal Sector 2017.

And if as a result of reviewing this framework you would like to talk to us about how to demonstrate continuing competence please contact us.

The Abilene Paradox

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From Organizational Dynamics, Summer 1988, pp. 17–43. © 1988 by the American Management Association, New York. All rights reserved.  The Abilene Paradox:The Management of Agreement – Jerry B. Harvey

The July afternoon in Coleman, Texas (population 5,607) was particularly hot— 104 degrees as measured by the Walgreen’s Rexall Ex-Lax temperature gauge. In addition, the wind was blowing fine-gained West Texas topsoil through the house. But the afternoon was still tolerable—even potentially enjoyable.
There was a fan going on the back porch; there was cold lemonade; and finally, there was entertainment. Dominoes. Perfect for the conditions. The game required little more physical exertion than an occasional mumbled comment, “Shuffle ‘em,” and an unhurried movement of the arm to place the spots in the appropriate perspective on the table. All in all, it had the makings of an agreeable Sunday afternoon in Coleman—this is, it was until my father-in-law suddenly said, “Let’s get in the
car and go to Abilene and have dinner at the cafeteria.”

I thought, “What, go to Abilene? Fifty-three miles? In this dust storm and heat? And in an
unairconditioned 1958 Buick?”

But my wife chimed in with, “Sounds like a great idea. I’d like to go. How about you,
Jerry?” Since my own preferences were obviously out of step with the rest I replied,
“Sounds good to me,” and added, “I just hope your mother wants to go.”

“Of course I want to go,” said my mother-inlaw. “I haven’t been to Abilene in a long time.”
So into the car and off to Abilene we went.
My predictions were fulfilled. The heat was brutal. We were coated with a fine layer of
dust that was cemented with perspiration by the time we arrived. The food at the cafeteria
provided first-rate testimonial material for antacid commercials.
Some four hours and 106 miles later we returned to Coleman, hot and exhausted. We sat
in front of the fan for a long time in silence.

Then, both to be sociable and to break the silence, I said, “It was a great trip, wasn’t it?”

No one spoke.

Finally my mother-in-law said, with some irritation, “Well, to tell the truth, I really didn’t enjoy it much and would rather have stayed here. I just went along because
the three of you were so enthusiastic about going. I wouldn’t have gone if you all
hadn’t pressured me into it.”

I couldn’t believe it. “What do you mean ‘you all’?” I said. “Don’t put me in the ‘you all’ group. I was delighted to be doing what we were doing. I didn’t want to go. I only went to satisfy the rest of you. You’re the culprits.”

My wife looked shocked. “Don’t call me a culprit. You and Daddy and Mama were the ones who wanted to go. I just went along to be sociable and to keep you happy. I would have had to be crazy to want to go out in heat like that.”

Her father entered the conversation abruptly. “Hell!” he said.  He proceeded to expand on what was already absolutely clear. “Listen, I never wanted to go to Abilene. I just thought you might be bored. You visit so seldom I wanted to be sure you enjoyed it. I would have preferred to playanother game of dominoes and eat the leftovers in the icebox.”

After the outburst of recrimination we all sat back in silence. Here we were, four reasonably sensible people who, of our own volition, had just taken a 106-mile trip across a godforsaken desert in a furnace-like temperature through a cloud-like dust storm to eat unpalatable food at a hole-in-the-wall cafeteria in Abilene, when none of us had really wanted to go.

In fact, to be more accurate, we’d done just the opposite of what we wanted to do. The whole situation simply didn’t make sense.

At least it didn’t make sense at the time.

 

 
JERRY B. HARVEY is professor of management science at the George Washington University in Washington, D.C. He is a graduate of the University of Texas in Austin, where he earned an undergraduate degree in business administration and a Ph.D. in social psychology.
A member of the International Consultant’s Foundation, a Diplomate of the American Board of Professional Psychology, and a member of the O.D. Network, he has served as a consultant to a wide variety of industrial, governmental, religious, and voluntary organizations. He has written a number of articles in the fields of organizational
behavior and education and currently is involved in the exploration of moral, ethical, and spiritual issues of work. In the pursuit of that interest, his book, The Abilene Paradox and Other Meditations on Management, was published by Lexington Books in 1988.

 

The horizon and the here & now

In recent months I have been reading, thinking and speaking about the future of work, more specifically, the future of learning at work.  At the same time, I work with professional people on basic skills, like the ability to have a structured conversation, to listen, and to allow a colleague to explore their ideas for themselves.  In other words, how to get to grips with the messy and difficult bits of working with people.

Horizon-scanning and working with people on practical skills form two strands of my work activity which are challenging in different ways.  Some of the time I am diving in, searching out ideas, identifying what matters and trying to create some understanding, for example, what does Artificial Intelligence mean for learning?  Are jobs for “newbies” going to exist in the future?  If not, how will people gain experience and practise skills?  These issues are intriguing.  Being informed about them allows me to present a rounded view to clients.

All the time, I’m doing my day job as a Learning & Development consultant too; talking with people about learning strategy, designing learning activities (online and experiential) and delivering face-to-face learning.  I also coach individuals, so I come close to what makes a fellow human-being tick, what troubles them and what makes them laugh.

Each day and each week I move back and forth from horizon-scanning, through to thinking about the particulars of a client organisation, to group dynamics, and individual, immediate human needs.  I try to help people make sense of one aspect or another as I go.

I read, see and hear a lot of things about how people work within organisations and how organisations view people.  I have a lot of ideas about the flow between the two.  I have been educated to think that I ought to come up with something original and brilliant to say before I publish my thoughts, but here and now I am going to just offer what I’m thinking, rather than some perfectly expressed solution.

What is emerging for me at the moment is the idea that our notion of “managers” is probably unhelpful.  Among professional people, informed self-management is eminently possible.  Note please the word “informed”.  I need to write about that more on another occasion, for now let me say I think that begins with first understanding yourself and your impact on others, as well as having clarity about your purpose at work.

Another thought that I am living with just now is that everything depends on context.  Our current world context is remarkable; I am writing at the time of a General Election, just after a major terrorist attack in Manchester, and as war and famine rage in North Africa, the Middle East and elsewhere.  My life spans the certainties of the Cold War and the current time, when old social and political fractures have opened up, and new ones created by the digital age have emerged to generate a cocktail of expectation and possibility hither-to unknown to humanity.

In a challenging and often frightening world we look for people who make sense of things for us, and this brings me back to the two strands of my working life.

As I stand at the front of the training room, Heads of Department, architects, solicitors and sales managers look to me and seem to say, “Make this easier for me!”  I share with them my enthusiasm and knowledge and help them to learn about their own abilities by getting them doing things which are slightly outside their comfort-zone.  That’s what I do; I try and make sense of some things for them and I set them going on a task which will help them realise that they are already capable of helping others to work effectively in many ways.

I want those people to know that they often don’t have to try as hard as they think they do.  Offering guidance and support, or even holding a colleague to account, is perhaps easier than they imagine.  They do not need to learn to be “other” or different.  In fact, they probably need to be more themselves.  A manager is not someone who makes other people do things; they are the person who makes it possible for other people to do things.  By thinking of the manager’s role as being a facilitator or enabler, the idea becomes less onerous.  It requires skill and that’s ok, because we are all more capable than we think and we can all learn.

Can we become facilitators and enablers now?  I think it would be a good time to try.  Just around the corner is a world of data analytics which will enable us all to see at a glance how colleagues are performing; how much time they spent on a project, or working in a team activity or communicating with a customer or client.  Perhaps you have that information already.  If not, it won’t be too long before we are all informed by more metrics than we can shake a stick at.  But there is more to working with people than that; now would be a good time to make sure we can still all be human too.